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What term refers to skin and its accessory structures?

What term refers to skin and its accessory structures?

Introduction to the Integumentary System The integumentary system refers to the skin and its accessory structures. In fact, the skin and accessory structures are the largest organ system in the human body.

What system is composed of the skin and accessory structures?

The skin and its accessory structures make up the integumentary system, which provides the body with overall protection. The skin is made of multiple layers of cells and tissues, which are held to underlying structures by connective tissue (Figure 5.2).

What are the structures of the skin?

Skin has three layers: The epidermis, the outermost layer of skin, provides a waterproof barrier and creates our skin tone. The dermis, beneath the epidermis, contains tough connective tissue, hair follicles, and sweat glands. The deeper subcutaneous tissue (hypodermis) is made of fat and connective tissue.

What layer of skin contains accessory structures?

dermis
The dermis also contains various structures, including hair follicles, glands (sweat and sebaceous glands), touch receptors, nails, a specialized muscle called arrector pili muscle that attaches to hair follicles and raises them up. Collectively, the structures are called skin adnexa or accessory structures.

What is accessory structure?

An accessory structure is a structure which is on the same parcel of property as a principal structure and the use of which is incidental to the use of the principal structure. Other examples of accessory structures include gazebos, picnic pavilions, boathouses, small pole barns, storage sheds, and similar buildings.

Which layer of the skin contains accessory structures?

What is the term used for the skin and its accessory structures such as the glands hair and nails?

Integumentary System. The skin and its accessory structures such as hair and nails.

What contains most of the accessory structures of the integumentary system?

Learning Objectives. Accessory structures of the skin include hair, nails, sweat glands, and sebaceous glands. These structures embryologically originate from the epidermis and can extend down through the dermis into the hypodermis.

What are the 3 accessory structures of the skin?

Accessory structures of the skin include the hair, nails, sweat glands and sebaceous glands. These structures embryologically originate from the epidermis and are often termed “appendages”; they can extend down through the dermis into the hypodermis.

What is the structure and function of skin?

The skin consists of two layers: the epidermis and the dermis. Beneath the dermis lies the hypodermis or subcutaneous fatty tissue. The skin has three main functions: protection, regulation and sensation. Wounding affects all the functions of the skin.

Where are the accessory structures of the skin?

Accessory structures of the skin include hair, nails, sweat glands, and sebaceous glands. These structures embryologically originate from the epidermis and can extend down through the dermis into the hypodermis.

What makes up the integumentary system of the body?

The skin and its accessory structures make up the integumentary system, which provides the body with overall protection. The skin is made of multiple layers of cells and tissues, which are held to underlying structures by connective tissue (Figure 1).

How are the layers of the skin held together?

The skin is made of multiple layers of cells and tissues, which are held to underlying structures by connective tissue (Figure 1). The deeper layer of skin is well vascularized (has numerous blood vessels). It also has numerous sensory, and autonomic and sympathetic nerve fibers ensuring communication to and from the brain.

Where are the coiled structures of the skin?

These coiled structures are usually at the junction between the dermis and the subcutaneous layer, with a duct leading through the dermis and epidermis to a pore on the skin surface, where the sweat is released (Graham-Brown and Bourke, 2006; Fig 2).

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